Charles Atlas: Glacier at Bloomberg SPACE, London

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Located on Finsbury Square, Central London, Bloomberg SPACE’s current exhibition is a collaboration between the video artist and director Charles Atlas, the South London Gallery and Bloomberg SPACE.

Within this busy district of London the space is a welcome retreat and offers a portal like experience as you enter through layers of curtain and are thrust in to Atlas’ 360 degree multi channel video installation. The height of the ceilings and therefore the projected films are impressive and lend to a completely immersive feel.

 

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For Glacier, 2013, Atlas has used footage from the Bloomberg digital archives and stock and found footage from other sources. The clear division of these different visuals is made all the more disorientating by the constant movement of them around the room. Using striking visuals such as underwater scenes, giant faces that look like they are from a commercial, a frantic looking eye and larger than life cows the space is transformed in to a cage which traps the shrunken audience members within its continuous loop. There is a brief respite from the moving images when the entire space fades to black, this is preceded by the whole room being enveloped with a projection of what it looks like outside the gallery when the windows are not blacked out. It is a if the viewer has been placed within a box which allows them to see it out but others to be unable to see in. The repetition of passers by walking around the walls of the room gives a groundhog day, claustrophobic feel. The use of sound within the space is also eerie as a continuous droning noise scores the visuals.

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The exhibition is on until the 30th of March and I would encourage anyone who visits to go at a less busy time, I attended roughly an hour before closing and there was no one else in the space. This added to the immersive, other worldly sensation of the work.

In the lead up to our final show for the Digital Media Arts Masters that I am currently undertaking, this immersive and engrossing feel is exactly the sort of thing I want to achieve in my own work. I will update my progress over the next two months!

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Murder in the Manor – Teaser Trailer

Above is a quick teaser trailer I did for an exciting new project at Preston Manor in Brighton called Murder in the Manor.

Murder in the Manor is an Arts Council funded collaboration between Brighton & Hove’s Royal Pavilion and Museums, the Little Green Pig creative writing group, and the website developer, Say Digital.

Check out the Murder in the Manor website for a 360′ tour of rooms of Preston Manor and to see how the murder mystery unfolds.

Jeff Keen Artist’s Sketchbook

Jeff Keen Dreams of The Archduke Sketchbook from Jennifer Milarski on Vimeo.

A film made for the Jeff Keen retrospective, Shoot The Wrx, Artists and Film Maker Jeff Keen, at Brighton Museum.
The film being shown in the gallery is closer to 20 minutes long but this version has been sped up to give a taste of what is inside.
Copyright belongs to The Jeff Keen Estate and Brighton & Hove Museum and Art Gallery.
The film was produced by Jennifer Milarski, with the help of Anne Nielsen.

Carrieres de Lumieres, Les Baux, France aka The most amazing exhibition I have EVER been to!!!

I have just got back from Provence and have to say the highlight, apart from the exquisite wine (I will now only drink clairette de die darling!), was by far a visit to the Carrieres de Lumieres in Les Baux. Luckily my mum had spotted an article in The Observer about the caves and so after convincing my partner to drive the two hours from where we were staying, wiggling up and down mountains, we arrived in, or I should probably say on, Les Baux. The video below shows the location and the stunning projections inside: Carrières de Lumières – Spectacle “Gauguin, Van… by culturespaces

As you will see it is a combination of Van Gogh and Gauguin’s work shown in the context of ‘Painters of Colour’. The soundtrack on the video is also the same as was played within the caves and had been perfectly mixed to convey the emotions through each era of the artist’s work.

The only thing the video doesn’t do justice to is the sheer scale and awe that you get from being in the space, it is literally gigantic and even before you enter the setting and the quarried cliff face is an artwork in itself! The fact that the floor and walls were being used and the way in which the paintings came to life nearly made me have a little cry! It was one of those situations where you wish you had thought of this, had been part of it, but also sheer joy that people in the world are out there creating these sorts of events. As I tend to mention a lot, I am interested in the ways in which digital media can enhance and compliment history and tradition and this was literally the most perfect example I have ever seen of this in action. You could see kids and adults alike with their interest sparked, perhaps much more so than would be the case with a static painting in a formal museum environment.

I should also mention that Jon Cocteau’s Le Testament d’Orphee, which was filmed in the caves in 1959 was also displayed within the caves, projected onto a stone wall, which provided an amazing viewing experience as the texture of the wall made the caves in the film almost 3d! And it was amazing to walk around and imagine the scenes being played out.

I shot quite a lot of film whilst I was out there so expect more from Provence to follow!

‘AND NO BIRDS SING’

As a bird, she haunted him….

This weekend (this was actually in May and I clearly forgot to press publish and have been away for a while!) Strange Beast took over The Booth Museum and created an interactive performance  which provided the oppurtunity to encounter The Booth Museum in an exciting and different way.

With laudenum induced women moaning and quoting Keats around you, the stuffed birds were brought to life with a simple torch which was shone onto the cages in the darkened museum.

In the butterfly room you were invited to choose your favourite butterfly or moth as a soundtrack of a female voice whispering the latin names of the various butterflies played.

Based around the tragic life of Pre-Raphaelite model, painter and writer, Elizabeth Sidal

I was slightly apprehensive about going back the Booth Museum, as the last time I was there was about 15 years ago on a school trip, and as with most childhood memories the reality when older is never as good and everything seems to be so much smaller than you remember!

Here is a link to a radio interview with Strange Beast about ‘And No Birds Sing’.

http://www.mixcloud.com/RadioZero/tuesday-live-in-brighton-on-radioreverb-15512/

© Patrick Dodds